It’s National Pet Poison Prevention Month

March is National Animal Poison Prevention MonthunnamedPrecription for Pet Poison Prevention from Dr. Jeanne Klafin, Seaport Animal Hospital


March is National Animal Poison Prevention Month, and this week is Pet Poison Prevention Week. Many common household items can cause serious illness to your pet cat or dog!
According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), over-the-counter medications and human prescription medications are two of the most common toxins ingested by pets. KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAHuman foods such as chocolate, grapes, raisins, onions and garlic can also cause harm to our furry friends. Even gums, candies and sweeteners containing xylitol, an artificial sweetener, can have serious consequences if ingested by a dog or cat.

Take action this week! pills-1422509Make sure that all human medications are secured in tamper-proof containers, and are stored in a safe place not accessible to pets, such as an eye-level locking cabinet. If your pets commonly rummage through your purse or bag, be sure to prevent them from eating gum or candy that may be lurking there.

pastel-1402050Did you know that most species of lilies can be fatally toxic to cats? Cats that ingest any part of the plant – even just the pollen – can be susceptible to life-threatening kidney failure. Check out ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control website for a complete list of toxic plants and other substances: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control